Dimensional weight (also known as volumetric weight) and actual weight are two important metrics used by shipping and logistics companies to determine the cost of shipping packages. While both metrics are used to determine the weight of a package, there are important differences between dimensional weight and actual weight.

Actual weight refers to the physical weight of a package. This is the weight that is measured when a package is put on a scale. Actual weight is straightforward and easy to measure, making it a simple and reliable way to determine the weight of a package.

Dimensional weight, on the other hand, is a calculated weight that takes into account the size and volume of a package in addition to its physical weight. Shipping companies use dimensional weight to determine the cost of shipping packages because it accurately reflects the amount of space a package takes up in a truck or shipping container.

Dimensional weight is calculated by multiplying the length, width, and height of a package and dividing the result by a volumetric divisor set by the shipping company. The resulting value is the dimensional weight of the package. If the dimensional weight is greater than the actual weight, the shipping company will use the dimensional weight to determine the cost of shipping the package.

One of the key differences between dimensional weight and actual weight is that dimensional weight takes into account the amount of space a package takes up, while actual weight only measures the physical weight of the package. This means that a package with a low actual weight but a large size could be more expensive to ship based on its dimensional weight.

Another difference is that dimensional weight can be affected by factors such as the type of packaging used and the shape of the package. For example, a package that is tall and skinny will have a higher dimensional weight than a package that is short and wide, even if they have the same actual weight.

In conclusion, dimensional weight and actual weight are two important metrics used by shipping and logistics companies to determine the cost of shipping packages. While both metrics are used to determine the weight of a package, there are important differences between dimensional weight and actual weight, with dimensional weight taking into account the size and volume of a package in addition to its physical weight.